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Heavy D, larger than life
Heavy D was "Mr. Big Stuff" on the mic.
November 10th, 2011
05:37 PM ET

Heavy D, larger than life

With Heavy D's death this week, I couldn't help but think about one of his most famous songs, "The Overweight Lover's in the House."
It was a lovable nickname that made everyone smile; people love the big jolly entertainer, right? There was nothing like seeing the big man dance, even if it was in those corny Sprite commercials.

And hip-hop is rife with large-and-in-charge rappers whose size helped catapult them to fame. For some reason, hip-hop fans gravitate to an MC who carries even more weight in life than what they carry on the mic. But it now appears that the same thing that helped make them popular, is leading to their demise.
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Filed under: Pop culture
Engage: Majority of Latinos still support president; Obama's 'body man' to leave
President Barack Obama listens to his personal assistant Reggie Love, who will leave his White House job soon.
November 10th, 2011
01:25 PM ET

Engage: Majority of Latinos still support president; Obama's 'body man' to leave

Engage with news and opinions from around the web about under-reported, untold stories from undercovered communities.

President Obama to lose 'body man' by end of the year
"[Reggie] Love’s exit comes at a time of transition for the administration: several longtime advisers have left over the last year, in keeping with the time-honored tradition that close aides do not abandon the president immediately before an election." - The Washington Post

Poll: Majority of Latinos still support Obama, don't know GOP candidates
“If the presidential election were today, Latino voters would support President Obama over his GOP opponent - whomever that may be - by a wide two-to-one margin, according to a new Univision/Latino Decisions poll.  Still, the poll suggests there's an opening for Republicans to make inroads with Latinos, a voting bloc that's increasing in importance. Latinos are still largely unfamiliar with the Republican candidates - for instance, more than half said they don't know enough about Herman Cain to offer an opinion about him.” - CBSNews.com

Gabrielle Giffords' 'hero intern'  wins school board seat
“Daniel Hernandez Jr., the 21-year-old intern in Rep. Gabrielle Giffords' (D-Ariz.) office who ran towards gunshots during the Tucson shooting, won a seat on an Arizona school board on Tuesday. He was elected to a vacant seat on the Sunnyside Unified School District governing board, which covers southern Tucson and adjacent areas in Pima County.” - The Huffington Post FULL POST

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Filed under: Engage
Researchers: African-Americans most likely to use physical punishment
Researchers said African Americans are among the most likely to use corporal punishment on children.
November 10th, 2011
11:50 AM ET

Researchers: African-Americans most likely to use physical punishment

A switch, a belt, a shoe, a hand. Paddling, whipping, whupping, spanking. The instruments and language of corporal punishment vary, but what connects them is how often they are employed as parenting tools.

Researchers who study corporal punishment say that parents of all ethnic groups, socioeconomic categories and education levels practice some form of physical punishment with their children.

“The majority of parents across all ethnic groups spank at some point,” said Elizabeth Gershoff, a professor and researcher on corporal punishment at the University of Texas at Austin.

But among the groups most likely to use it: African-Americans.

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Filed under: Ethnicity • Race • Who we are
November 10th, 2011
09:00 AM ET

Red Chair interview: Edward James Olmos

Ask Edward James Olmos who he is, and he will say that he's a storyteller.

An actor, director, activist, yes. But the story of how he became those things starts when he was 5 or 6 years old, back when he fell in love with baseball. He couldn't throw. He couldn't hit. He didn't even really understand what a baseball was.  But it was the thing he most wanted to understand.

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Filed under: Age • Latino in America • Pop culture
November 10th, 2011
06:01 AM ET

The tech trailblazer behind 'Black College Football' video game

Jacqui Beauchamp heads up Nerjyzed Entertainment, the Baton Rouge, Louisiana, video game and 3D animation firm that created the game "Black College Football: BCFX: The Xperience." It's a challenging field, especially for Beauchamp: "I'm an African American female, and every day I've got to get people to see me - to see me - and not that I'm an African-American female."

Soledad O'Brien reports "Black in America: The New Promised Land – Silicon Valley," at 8 p.m. November 13 on CNN.