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Despite immigration reforms, many young immigrants still in limbo
Monji Dolon's immigration status makes it impossible to accept full-time work in the technology field.
December 26th, 2011
06:00 AM ET

Despite immigration reforms, many young immigrants still in limbo

By Yasmin Amer, CNN

(CNN) - It wasn't until his senior year of high school in North Carolina that Monji Dolon found out about his murky immigration status.

His family had emigrated from Bangladesh in 1991 when Dolon was 5 years old and since then Dolon, his mother and his brother have lived without legal residency in the United States.

Uncertain of what to check under "residency" on his college applications, Dolon learned at the age of 18 that he was in an ongoing battle to stay in the country he had grown up in.

"I remember having a huge sense of panic at the time," say Dolon, now 25.

The Department of Homeland Security announced reforms this year that would halt the deportations of young immigrants who pose no threat to security. It said it also would review almost 300,000 cases on an individual basis - something it had not been done before.

Individuals without a criminal record are considered low priority for forced or immediate deportation. But without permanent relief, many like Monji Dolon are still in immigration limbo.

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Filed under: Education • How we live • Immigration
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