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Vagina enters stage left - or is it right?
Protesters have taken to the streets in reaction to what they see as an assault on their reproductive rights.
March 28th, 2012
01:21 PM ET

Vagina enters stage left - or is it right?

By Wayne Drash and Jessica Ravitz, CNN

(CNN) – If anyone is comfortable speaking openly and boldly about women's bodies, it's Eve Ensler. The playwright and activist behind "The Vagina Monologues" has been at it for years.

So when she watches American politics of late - especially the conversations swirling around women's reproductive rights - she feels both amused and vindicated.

"The vagina has become so real, so present, so powerful that people are going after it directly," she said. "It's evidence that we're winning."
America is abuzz about women's issues.

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Filed under: Girls • Health • Who we are • Women
Engage: FBI to help investigate beating death of Iraqi American
An image of Shaima Alawadi, an Iraqi woman who was beaten to death in her California home.
March 28th, 2012
12:00 PM ET

Engage: FBI to help investigate beating death of Iraqi American

Engage with news and opinions from around the web about under-reported stories from undercovered communities.

FBI investigates murder of Iraqi woman as family mourns her death  –USA Today/Detroit Free Press

Republican women call for White House to reject comedian Bill Maher's million donation after his statements on women –National Public Radio

Report: Latina workforce –NBC Latino

The forgotten female mathematician that Albert Einstein called "significant" - The New York Times

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Opinion: What happened in France could happen anywhere
Gilles Bernheim, Great Rabbi of France (2nd from right), and others march on March 25 in Toulouse, France where three Jewish children and their teacher were killed.
March 28th, 2012
10:00 AM ET

Opinion: What happened in France could happen anywhere

Editor’s Note:  Philip Meissner is a New York based attorney. He also founded JewishSafeHavenFund.org, a group dedicated to protecting Jews from terrorist attack in America and abroad.

By Philip Meissner, Special to CNN

(CNN) – Buenos Aires, Argentina. Mumbai, India. Bangkok, Thailand. And now Toulouse, France.  While we have seen a recent wave of anti-Semitic attacks here in the United States - including the firebombing of a synagogue in Rutherford, New Jersey and cars set on fire in an Orthodox neighborhood of Midwood, Brooklyn - a series of organized terrorist attacks is also being carried out at an ever-accelerating pace against Jews overseas.  One cannot help but wonder if American Jews are safe from the growing threat, either at home, or abroad.

As a young boy of nine-years old, my father miraculously escaped Nazi Germany on Kristallnacht, November 9, 1938. His parents had the foresight to know that they could no longer stay in Berlin.  They first went to Poland to say good-bye to their parents, my great-grandparents, who were tragically convinced that the Nazis in Germany would pass by as just another political party, and that they would be safe in Poland. That was the last time they saw one another. My grandparents left everything behind, and undertook the dangerous journey of traveling by train to Marseille, France.  They thereafter boarded the SS Normandie for its last voyage to New York before the war, which ultimately saved their lives.

Decades later, after establishing their life in the United States, our link to the Holocaust came full circle as my eldest sister married into the Bielski family, whose heroism was recounted recently in the film "Defiance."  The Bielskis did not have either the good fortune, or the inclination to leave Europe during the war.  Following the murder of their parents, the Bielski brothers- Tuvia, Zus and Asael- realized that they would have to save themselves.  They formed the Bielski brigade and provided safe haven to the Jews who joined them.  For almost three years, they fought against the Germans and provided food and shelter to 1,250 Jewish men, women and children in the forests of Western Belorussia.  This was the largest armed rescue of Jews by Jews during the war.

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Filed under: History • Religion • What we think • Where we live
March 28th, 2012
07:00 AM ET

Hoodie's evolution from fashion mainstay to symbol of injustice

By Emanuella Grinberg, CNN

(CNN) - Whether you're a high schooler or Ted Kaczynski, a soccer mom or a Rocky Balboa fan, you've likely embraced the hooded sweatshirt at some point in life.

For all its comfort and simplicity, the hoodie leads a dual life. Utilitarian and homogenous in form, hooded garments have been wardrobe staples of monks and hip-hop stars, Silicon Valley programmers and tycoons alike.

Yet it still carries a social stigma that has made it the object of legislative bans and political speeches. Now, amid widespread outcry over the death of Florida teen Trayvon Martin, the hoodie has become a symbol of social injustice.

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