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The new American household: 3 generations, 1 roof
The Moura family has found that living together helps ease the pain of the recession.
April 3rd, 2012
02:00 PM ET

The new American household: 3 generations, 1 roof

By Les Christie, CNNMoney

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- As the economy continues to take a toll on consumers' finances, a growing number of people are discovering that becoming roommates with mom and dad, or a 20- or 30-something son or daughter, helps to ease some of the financial pain in tough times.

As of 2010, 4.4 million U.S. homes held three generations or more under one roof, a 15% increase from 3.8 million households two years earlier, according to the latest data available from the Census Bureau.

When Alicia Moura's father-in-law, Aecio D'Silva, retired from teaching at the University of Arizona in 2010 to pursue private-sector projects in aqua-culture and bio-fuel, he didn't expect to wait long before his efforts paid off. But then the economy tanked, development funds dried up and his ventures languished.

Soon afterward, Alicia started experiencing some medical issues with her pregnancy and the family decided it would be best to move in together. Now everyone - Alicia, her husband, their two young daughters and the in-laws - live under one roof.

"We not only save money by having a joined household, but we save on stress, time and other resources by having in-home day care," said Moura.

Read the full story on CNNMoney

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Filed under: Census • Economy • Family • How we live
Engage: California affirmative action ban upheld
The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a ban on using racial preferences in California university admissions.
April 3rd, 2012
12:08 PM ET

Engage: California affirmative action ban upheld

Engage with news and opinions from around the web about under-reported stories from undercovered communities.

Affirmative action bans upheld in California courts - The Los Angeles Times

Universities, colleges works show pattern around court rulings to enroll more students of color - The New York Times

African-Americans and Latinos use 401(k) plans for financial relief at a higher rate - USA Today

Profile: Aziz Ansari on Indian role models: 'There was no one Indian on TV' - National Public Radio

A variety of 'DREAM Acts' abound in  election year - Multiamerican.org

Alvin Boutte Sr., co-founder of largest black-owned bank, dies - Chicago Sun-Times

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Filed under: Engage
Same-sex couples file suit against Defense of Marriage Act
Frances Herbert and Takako Ueda married last year and are suing to allow Ueda to remain in the United States.
April 3rd, 2012
10:52 AM ET

Same-sex couples file suit against Defense of Marriage Act

By Stephanie Siek, CNN

(CNN) – Lawyers representing five same-gender couples are suing the federal government over the Defense of Marriage Act, which they say unfairly denies same-sex married couples the right to sponsor their noncitizen spouses for permanent residency in the United States.

Immigration Equality, an advocacy group that supports the rights of gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgendered and HIV-positive immigrants, filed the suit April 2 in New York district court. It names as defendants Attorney General Eric Holder, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Director Alejandro Mayorkas and two other immigration officials.

The suit alleges that the federal government is violating the equal protection clause of the U.S. Constitution by denying rights to one set of legally married couples while preserving the rights of another, based on gender and sexual orientation.

FULL POST

Opinion: Let women into Augusta golf club
Demonstrators gather during Masters week demonstrations outside the gates of Augusta National Golf Club in 2003.
April 3rd, 2012
09:01 AM ET

Opinion: Let women into Augusta golf club

Editor's note: Martha Burk is a political psychologist and an expert on women's issues. She is co-founder of the Center for Advancement of Public Policy, a research and policy analysis organization in Washington, and director of the Corporate Accountability Project for the National Council of Women's Organizations. She serves as the money editor for Ms. magazine. Her latest book is "Your Voice, Your Vote: The Savvy Woman's Guide to Power, Politics, and the Change We Need."

By Martha Burk, Special to CNN

(CNN) – Well, well. The boys at Augusta National Golf Club - members and sponsors alike - are in a big bind. Nine years after I led an unsuccessful effort by the National Council of Women's Organizations to open membership in the club to women, the "woman problem" is back.

This time it involves Virginia Rometty, the first female chief executive of IBM. IBM is a major sponsor of Augusta National's Masters Golf Tournament, and up to now its CEOs have always been given membership in the club. But none has ever been a woman. So what happens now - will Augusta National open its doors to women? Or will IBM pull its sponsorship and force its other executives to resign their club memberships?

These are the only two real choices.

Read Martha Burk's full column

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Filed under: Discrimination • Gender • What we think • Women
NYPD's ‘stop, question and frisk’ policy is racial profiling,critics say
Some say the New York Police Department's "stop, question and frisk" policy is racist.
April 3rd, 2012
04:00 AM ET

NYPD's ‘stop, question and frisk’ policy is racial profiling,critics say

By Steve Kastenbaum, CNN Radio National Correspondent

New York (CNN) – Every time a cop car slows down near him, Djibril Toure worries that he’s about to be stopped and questioned. Not because he did anything wrong - the 39-year-old businessman and activist was born and raised in New York, attended Cornell University and said he’s never committed a crime.

But New York police are allowed to stop and question anyone on the street if they have a reasonable suspicion that the person was involved in illegal activity, is about to commit a crime or is carrying a gun. The policy is known as “stop, question and frisk.” Close to 700,000 of the searches took place in New York last year, a record number.

Proponents say it’s an effective tool that has contributed to a historically low murder rate in New York. Critics say it’s racial profiling. More often than not, the people stopped are black or Hispanic males, according to New York Police Department statistics.

FULL POST