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Opinion: Online anonymity is the new robe and hood of hatred
"With a few keystrokes, people have allowed the hate in their heart to reveal itself," Tangela Ekhoff writes.
April 17th, 2012
03:04 PM ET

Opinion: Online anonymity is the new robe and hood of hatred

Editor's Note: Tangela Ekhoff is an inspirational speaker and ordained elder in the Presbyterian Church, U.S.A. She blogs about marriage, motherhood and life in Oklahoma at Homegirl on the Range, and has written for CNN's Belief blog.

By Tangela Ekhoff, Special to CNN

(CNN) - On a hot, steamy summer day, when I was 10 or 11, my mama and I rode downtown to do a little shopping. As we got off the bus, I looked up the street toward the Alabama capitol. In the distance, I could see a gathering of people. Glimmers of white dotted the crowd like cotton on the side of a dusty road.

After we finished, we got a couple of cold Cokes to go. My mother was uneasy that day.

"We need to hurry up and get home before something bad happens,” she said.

As we got on the bus and headed up the street, I could see more clearly. It was a Ku Klux Klan rally. I looked out the window and right outside the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, where Rev. Martin Luther King's voice became the sound of movement, there was a grown man and a little boy of maybe 5 or 6. They both wore matching white robes and hoods on their heads so you couldn't make out their faces. The little boy looked me square in the eye, gave me the finger, and screamed "Dirty N-–." The man patted the boy on the back and laughed out loud. This wasn't 1955. It was 1979 or 1980.

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Opinion: Women need a ‘Ledbetter moment’ for equal pay
President Obama applauds Lilly Ledbetter before signing the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act into law in January 2009.
April 17th, 2012
11:40 AM ET

Opinion: Women need a ‘Ledbetter moment’ for equal pay

Editor’s note: Linda Hallman is executive director and CEO of the American Association of University Women.

By Linda Hallman, Special to CNN

(CNN) – Today is Equal Pay Day - the symbolic date marking how long women must work, starting from January 1, 2011, to make what men earned in 2011 alone – although it would be better marked where it should be, December 31.

A lot needs to happen to chip away at the extra four months it takes for women’s wages to equal what a man makes in one year, and of course, a change in date assumes a change in data. But the latest numbers show that in 2010, women working full-time in the United States made just 77%, on average, of what men made, a gap of 23% that only widens for women of color.

For now, the numbers will keep Equal Pay Day in April and, sadly, not everyone cares.

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Filed under: 2012 Election • Discrimination • Economy • Gender • How we live • Politics • Women
Engage: The late Manning Marable wins Pulitzer for Malcolm X biography
Manning Marable with a depiction of Malcolm X.
April 17th, 2012
11:08 AM ET

Engage: The late Manning Marable wins Pulitzer for Malcolm X biography

Engage with news and opinions from around the web about under-reported stories from undercovered communities.

Marable's 'Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention' wins history Pulitzer - NewsOne

Florida Supreme Court to consider whether undocumented immigrant can join Florida Bar - South Florida Sun Sentinel

Opinions: Are gay rights still controversial? - The New York Times Room for Debate

Black male teens' perspectives: 'I don't think it's about a hoodie. I think it's about race' - Tampa Bay Times

California tribe seeks short-term river closure to protect from harassment during ceremony - Native News Network

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Filed under: Engage
And justice for all?: Debating the Zimmerman arrest and race in America
This Washington rally last month was just one of many around the country protesting the Trayvon Martin killing.
April 17th, 2012
05:00 AM ET

And justice for all?: Debating the Zimmerman arrest and race in America

By Michael Saba, CNN

(CNN) - Protesters and activists demanding justice for slain Florida teen Trayvon Martin are no closer to closure, even with the news that second-degree murder charges were filed against shooter George Zimmerman. The charges were the latest development in a heated national debate over race and justice in America.

The debate on CNN iReport mirrored a national outcry, which saw thousands taking to the streets in "Million Hoodie" marches, demanding that formal charges be filed against Zimmerman.

"Justice for Trayvon" was a common refrain on the placards of street protesters, and in the comments section of CNN and other news and media websites.

There was also a countervailing opinion of skepticism about the murky details of the case. Before the charges against Zimmerman were filed, many expressed concern over how the case was playing out in the court of public opinion, saying that judgment should be withheld until the legal system had enough time to render a proper verdict. Reaction to the charges against Zimmerman has been mixed, with many iReporters and CNN commenters expressing a mixture of relief, puzzlement and disappointment.

Read the full story

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Filed under: iReport • Race • What we think