.
April 30th, 2012
06:00 PM ET

Running group turns into nationwide movement

By LaNese Harris, CNN

(CNN) – African-American women are joining forces to battle the alarming rates of heart disease, high blood pressure and obesity that are affecting millions of Americans.

The movement is called Black Girls Run!, and it was formed to encourage women of color to get fit and live healthier lifestyles.

Toni Carey and Ashley Hicks are the creators of Black Girls Run! They wanted to drop some pounds and get in shape, but they soon saw their personal goals turning into a nationwide movement.

"I had no idea that Black Girls Run! was going to grow to be this size," Hicks said. "Toni and I feel really blessed and excited that we are able to help so many people."

Read the full post on CNN's This Just In blog

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Filed under: Black in America • Health • Race • Women
Opinion: Why are young women more ambitious than men?
A Pew poll reports that two-thirds of young women say that "being successful in a high-paying career" is an important life goal.
April 30th, 2012
03:00 PM ET

Opinion: Why are young women more ambitious than men?

Editor's note: Kathleen Gerson, author of "The Unfinished Revolution: Coming of Age in a New Era of Gender, Work, and Family," is a professor of sociology and collegiate professor of arts and science at New York University. She is a 2011-2012 Fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University.

By Kathleen Gerson, Special to CNN

(CNN) - In a headline that calls out for attention - "A Gender Reversal on Career Aspirations" - the Pew Research Center reports that two-thirds of young women now say "being successful in a high-paying career or profession" is one of the most important goals in their lives.

While it may not be surprising that these women express more ambition than their mothers and grandmothers, it is surprising when they also display more ambition than their male peers. Is this a sign, then, that we are witnessing "a gender reversal"? Or does it represent a kind of denial - on the part of young women and men - about the obstacles they will ultimately face at the workplace and in life?

In the same poll, marriage and parenthood remain important life goals for all young adults, with 86% of women and 82% of men listing marriage as "very important" or "one of the most important things" in life. Children are even more desired, with 95% of young women and 90% of young men placing "being a good parent" in these same categories.

Yet young people's actions, at least when it comes to family commitments, appear at odds with these stated aspirations.

Read Kathleen Gerson's full column

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Filed under: Age • Gender • Girls • What we think • Women
Engage: Thousands gather in celebration of Native American heritage
‘Gathering of Nations’ is said to be the world's largest annual meeting of indigenous and Native American people.
April 30th, 2012
01:12 PM ET

Engage: Thousands gather in celebration of Native American heritage

Engage with news and opinions from around the web about under-reported stories from undercovered communities.

Native American powwow draws thousands to New Mexico - Chicago Tribune

Henry Louis Gates helps actor Samuel L. Jackson find his roots - The Huffington Post

More children identify as biracial, but what does that mean? - The Washington Post 

New wave of African-American networks aim to relate to large black audience  - Variety

Opinion: Education vs. the lure of pro basketball
From left: Kentucky's Anthony Davis, Doron Lamb,Terrence Jones, coach John Calipari, Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, Marquis Teague.
April 30th, 2012
12:07 PM ET

Opinion: Education vs. the lure of pro basketball

Editor's note: David J. Pate Jr, is an assistant professor at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Helen Bader School of Social Welfare. He is a member of the Ford Foundation Scholars Network on Masculinity and the Wellbeing of African American Males. The piece was written in association with The Op-ed Project, which seeks to expand the range of opinion voices.

By David J. Pate Jr., Special to CNN

(CNN) - As a father, my heart breaks.

The starting five of the University of Kentucky basketball team — the 2012 NCAA champions — announced earlier this month that they're leaving college to go pro. It happens every year in the wake of March Madness, but as an African-American father, I feel my heart crack a little.

Yes these young champions will make money, lots of it, and will have access to instant fame.

I understand why they made the choice, but their collective decision says something about the options in front of all young African-American men. The Great Migration that saw my elders move from the farm to the factory has shifted; these days, too many men of promise move from college to pro sports.

I've been researching the lives of black men for much of my entire career, as a social worker for 15 years in Chicago and since 1998 as a college professor and scholar in Milwaukee. I've interviewed them, written about them and filmed them, capturing their lives and hopes; I've spent most of my time with men who had little to no incomes and limited academic and employment skills. They are often frustrated, homeless, unemployed and debt-ridden.

Read David J. Pate Jr.'s full column

Opinion: Why wave of Mexican immigration stopped
Migrant workers load cilantro in Colorado. The farmer said business is suffering because there are fewer Mexican workers.
April 30th, 2012
05:00 AM ET

Opinion: Why wave of Mexican immigration stopped

Editor's note: Jeffrey S. Passel is a senior demographer at the Pew Hispanic Center and a nationally known expert on immigration to the United States and the demography of racial and ethnic groups. D'Vera Cohn is a senior writer at the Pew Research Center. From 1985 to 2006, she was a reporter at The Washington Post, writing chiefly about demographic trends and immigration.

By Jeffrey S. Passel and D'Vera Cohn, Special to CNN

(CNN) - To those of us who have studied the largest wave of immigration in history from a single country to the United States - the four-decade-long influx of millions of Mexicans - it seemed inconceivable that it would ever come to a halt. Yet, as our new Pew Hispanic Center report has shown, it has.

Study: Mexican immigration to United States slows to a standstill

Our analysis of Mexican and U.S. data sources indicates that at least as many Mexicans and their families are leaving the United States as are arriving in the United States from Mexico. As a result, the Mexican-born population in the United States decreased from 12.6 million in 2007 to 12 million in 2011. This appears to be the first sustained decline in the number of Mexican immigrants since the Great Depression, and it is entirely because of a reduction in illegal immigration - more going home and fewer coming. Today, we estimate that 51% of all Mexican immigrants living in the United States are unauthorized. In 2007, that figure was 56%.

Read Jeffrey S. Passel and D'Vera Cohn's full column