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Opinion: Is civil rights group losing its relevance?
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. attends a prayer pilgrimage in 1957, the year he would co-found the SCLC.
July 2nd, 2012
10:53 AM ET

Opinion: Is civil rights group losing its relevance?

Editor's note: Roland S. Martin is a syndicated columnist and author of "The First: President Barack Obama's Road to the White House." He is a commentator for the TV One cable network and host/managing editor of its Sunday morning news show, "Washington Watch with Roland Martin."

By Roland S. Martin, CNN Contributor

(CNN) - Whenever someone has lived a solid and productive life, the pastor at his or her funeral may turn to Matthew 25:21 to offer a few words the good Lord may utter as the person's spirit ascends to heaven: "Well done, good and faithful servant!"

In the pantheon of civil rights organizations, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference stands tall as one of the greatest groups ever to advance the cause of civil rights, helping bring the hatred and bigotry of Jim Crow to its knees.

From its marches and protests to its negotiations with political and business leaders and its efficient work with other civil rights groups, the SCLC's work has been legendary.

Yet 55 years after its co-founding by the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., it is an organization that makes headlines today more for infighting among members and the revolving door that its top leadership positions have become - all while crucial social justice issues continue to fester for African-Americans and others.

Read Roland Martin's full column

soundoff (One Response)
  1. Hamsta

    Maybe if all of the civil rights groups weren't constantly pulling the race card on bogus issues such as the Trayvon Martin case and phone deposits at hotels, they might not have lost their credibility.

    July 2, 2012 at 6:25 pm | Report abuse |