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A look back: The March on Washington
The civil rights leader Martin Luther KIng (C) waves to supporters on the Mall during the 'March on Washington'.
August 28th, 2012
06:36 PM ET

A look back: The March on Washington

(TIME) - So many scenes from the August 28, 1963 March on Washington are today so familiar — and the cadence of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech is so much a part of the national consciousness — it’s easy forget that for the hundreds of thousands of people who marched, the event was wholly, thrillingly new. There had been, of course, other civil rights protests, marches and demonstrations. But none had been so large (estimates range anywhere from 200,000 to 300,00 people) and none garnered so much attention before, during and, especially, after the event itself.

[See the Lightbox feature on photographs of MLK murals across the United States.]

The landmark 1957 Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom, for example, which also took place in the nation’s capital, had shown everyone — segregationists and civil rights proponents, alike — that large, peaceable rallies in the heart of Washington were not only possible, but in fact were necessary if the movement was ever going to achieve its central, early goals of desegregation and voting rights reform.

But the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom was on a scale so much larger than anything that had come before that it is rightly recalled as a touchstone moment: a single event so significant that the history of the movement can, in a sense, be measured in terms of Before the March, and After the March. The day, meanwhile, is remembered almost exclusively for MLK’s “Dream” speech, famously delivered to the throngs from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. (“I Have a Dream” itself was, in a way, a work in progress; King had delivered a speech to 25,000 people in Detroit several months before, for example, that included several sections and phrases that he would include, verbatim, in his magisterial address in August 1963.)

See the pictures from the March

Opinion: GOP, big tent or big mess?
Republicans gather for their convention in Tampa, Florida, as a party with deep divisions, says Ruben Navarrette.
August 28th, 2012
02:18 PM ET

Opinion: GOP, big tent or big mess?

Editor's note: Ruben Navarrette Jr. is a CNN contributor and a nationally syndicated columnist with the Washington Post Writers Group. Follow him on Twitter: @rubennavarrette.

By Ruben Navarrette Jr., CNN Contributor

(CNN) - Now that delegates have converged on Tampa, Florida, for the Republican National Convention, one has to wonder whether there is enough room in the arena for all the conflicting and contradictory elements of the modern Republican Party.

There is the camp that claims it wants to be more inclusive, broader in its appeal and more welcoming to women, gays and minorities. Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush recently warned that, because of changing demographics, the GOP has to "reach out to a much broader audience than we do today."

But then there is the camp that ensured that the Republican platform included language rejecting not just same-sex marriage but also the watered-down alternative that many elected officials find more palatable: civil unions.

The GOP platform committee also defeated a proposed amendment that said all Americans should be treated "equally under the law" as long as they're not hurting anyone else.

Read Ruben Navarette Jr.'s full column

Opinion: At convention, GOP leaders reflect U.S. diversity
South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley is among the Republican leaders who will be speaking at the GOP convention.
August 28th, 2012
11:01 AM ET

Opinion: At convention, GOP leaders reflect U.S. diversity

Editor's note: William J. Bennett, a CNN contributor, is the author of  "The Book of Man: Readings on the Path to Manhood." He was U.S. secretary of education from 1985 to 1988 and director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy under President George H.W. Bush.

By William Bennett, CNN Contributor

(CNN) - When the Republican National Convention kicks off this week in Tampa, Florida, the nation will notice one thing before anything else: This is not your father's or grandfather's Republican Party. Rather, it's a party with leaders as diverse as the country it intends to represent.

With the nation's changing demographics, Republicans can no longer rely on the South and Midwest to carry them to victory in 2012. Instead, they must broaden their base into traditionally purple and blue states. It's an uphill battle: President Obama leads by a sizeable margin with women and by wide margins with Latino and black voters. But it's not insurmountable. Romney already leads with men by roughly the same number President Obama leads with women. Nor is it unprecedented. Republicans won a landslide victory in the 2010 fall midterm elections. Now they must devise a strategy to repeat that.

Republicans, in short, must repeat what they did in their landslide victory in the 2010 fall midterm elections.

Read William Bennett's full column

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Filed under: Ethnicity • How we look • Politics • Race • What we think
August 28th, 2012
08:00 AM ET

Neighborhood still bearing Katrina's wounds awaits Isaac

By Vivian Kuo, CNN

(CNN) - The 30-mile stretch between Biloxi and Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, is still dotted with battle wounds from Hurricane Katrina seven years later.

Concrete slabs and steps that lead to nothing but trash and overgrown weeds are all that is left of historic brick homes.

But amid the slabs are majestic homes with grand, sweeping porches and perfectly manicured lawns.

The owners of these homes are as tough and resilient as only survivors of one of the deadliest storms in history could be.

State-by-state: Isaac evacuations, delays

Lifelong Bay St. Louis resident Corky Hadden lives on the spot of his childhood home, set off the water where the bay feeds into the Gulf of Mexico.

While he and his family evacuated to safety inland, Katrina's ravaging storm surge swept the house right off its stilts, leaving only the foundation intact.

"We had some old columns that the old house stood on, and those columns were picked clean, there was nothing left on them," he said.

Determined, Hadden rebuilt where his boyhood home once stood, both stronger and higher.

"I've got poured concrete pillars filled with steel, 10 times more steel than before," he said. "We're now 24 feet above sea level, 11 feet from the ground."

Isaac could bring in a 12-foot storm surge, which would mean Hadden's first floor could take on some water.

"We don't have anything important below that 24-foot elevation," he said.

Read the full story

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Filed under: Community • History • Where we live