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Opinion: It's Jackie Robinson Day, but black boys no longer dream of playing baseball
Jackie Robinson, subject of the new film "42," helped integrate Major League Baseball as a player for the Brooklyn Dodgers.
April 15th, 2013
12:17 PM ET

Opinion: It's Jackie Robinson Day, but black boys no longer dream of playing baseball

Editor's note: Kevin Powell is an activist, public speaker, writer and president of BK Nation, a new national and multicultural organization focused on civic engagement and community development. He is the author of “Barack Obama, Ronald Reagan, and the Ghost of Dr. King: Blogs and Essays.” Follow him on Twitter: @kevin_powell.

By Kevin Powell, Special to CNN

(CNN) I love baseball, deeply.

I played stickball and punchball growing up on the potholed streets of Jersey City, and dreamed of becoming a second baseman for the New York Yankees.

I hungrily digested book after book on historic and mythical figures such as Joe DiMaggio and Ty Cobb, and played Little League, Babe Ruth League and high school baseball.

Little did I know that Jackie Robinson, the first black player in Major League Baseball in the modern era, had created the possibility of dreams for black boys like me. As a child I only vaguely knew that he broke baseball's color line.

In the new film "42," this weekend's top-grossing movie, more Americans will learn  about how Robinson heroically integrated Major League Baseball.

But on Jackie Robinson Day there are fewer African-American players in the sport, and many black boys no longer aspire to play baseball.

FULL POST

April 15th, 2013
08:33 AM ET

Opinion: Rubio's tough line on immigration makes sense

Editor's note: Ruben Navarrette is a CNN contributor and a nationally syndicated columnist with the Washington Post Writers Group. Follow him on Twitter: @rubennavarrette.

By Ruben Navarrette, CNN Contributor

San Diego (CNN) - Every gang needs a leader. And what has become undeniably clear in recent days is that the de facto leader of the Gang of Eight is Marco Rubio.

The Florida lawmaker, and potential 2016 Republican presidential candidate, appeared on seven Sunday talk shows, discussing - in English and Spanish - the specifics of a comprehensive immigration reform bill that he hammered out with three other Senate Republicans and four Senate Democrats. The legislation is expected to be formally unveiled on Tuesday.

This means that, by Wednesday, just about everyone will be angry. Conservatives will declare the provisions of the bill too lenient, while Hispanics will condemn them as too punitive. Welcome to the immigration debate.

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