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Women and men are now even in the jobs recovery
Both men and women have now gained back half the jobs they lost in the financial crisis.
December 10th, 2012
05:30 PM ET

Women and men are now even in the jobs recovery

By , CNNMoney

(CNN Money) - Forget the "mancession" or the "he-covery." Men suffered the biggest job losses in the financial crisis, and also gained the most post-recession jobs.

But now, men and women have equal footing in the recovery.

As of November, both genders have gained back half the jobs they lost in the financial crisis, according to Labor Department data.

The recession hit male-dominated industries like construction and manufacturing, far harder than female-dominated industries like health care and education. As a result, men lost 6.2 million jobs between early 2007 and 2010, accounting for two thirds of all the jobs lost in the crisis.

Men have since gained back 3.1 million, or roughly 50%, of all the jobs they lost. Their biggest gains have been in professional jobs, factories making long-lasting goods like autos and machinery, and retail.

Both layoffs and the recovery seem to have caught up with women later than men. By November, women gained a slight edge over men, recovering 53% of the 2.8 million jobs they lost during the financial crisis.

Their biggest gains have been in education and health care, and professional services.

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Filed under: Economy • How we live • Women
Youth unemployment seen as 'scarring' by global group
A new study from the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) looks at the long-term impact of unemployment on youth.
July 10th, 2012
08:24 AM ET

Youth unemployment seen as 'scarring' by global group

By Annalyn Censky @CNNMoney

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) - As the jobs crisis drags on, high unemployment could permanently damage the economic prospects of the world's youngest workers, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) warned Tuesday.

A lack of jobs for workers ages 15 to 24 could create a "scarring effect" on their long-term career paths and future earnings prospects, the OECD said.

Last year, about 18.6% of youth were neither employed nor in school or training programs across the OECD's 34 countries, the think tank said.

In the United States, that percentage was 14.8%.

Read the full post 

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Filed under: Age • Economy • How we live