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Opinion: An American in disguise in rural China
The idea of an American who is ethnically Chinese has not yet trickled down to rural China, Clarissa Wei writes.
January 20th, 2012
12:37 PM ET

Opinion: An American in disguise in rural China

Editor's note:Clarissa Wei is a freelance journalist who travels between New York and Los Angeles.

By Clarissa Wei, Special to CNN GO

(CNN) - I’m American, not Chinese.

I refuse to even use the hyphenated term Chinese-American.

I was born in the United States and raised in Los Angeles. Though some ABCs (American-born Chinese) want to be recognized as “real Chinese,” I don’t.

In fact, I’d imagine it would be offensive to the Chinese if I were called a “real Chinese.” It would be a total lie.

My parents immigrated from Taiwan in 1990 with pharmaceutical degrees and very limited English.

But before moving to Shanghai for school, I had little to no connection to China. I wasn’t familiar with Chinese holidays, couldn’t tell you the name of the current Chinese president, and didn’t even know the name of the last Chinese dynasty.

I’m as American as the white kid down the hall who moved to China the same time as me. I insist on telling people I’m American because that’s what I am.

However, this concept simply did not fly throughout my trip to rural China this past autumn.

Read Clarissa Wei's full post on CNN GO

soundoff (2 Responses)
  1. ma & pa

    We are all members of the family of Human.

    January 22, 2012 at 11:23 pm | Report abuse |
  2. :P THATS RIGHT

    WE CAN ALL GET ALONG WE ARE ALL SKILLED AND TALENTED ALL WE HAVE TO DO IS DO IT! I WILL PERSEVERE! AND FIGHT FOR THE HUMAN RACE NO HATE............................

    January 20, 2012 at 2:29 pm | Report abuse |