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Overheard of CNN.com: Decision to defer some deportations symbolic
In February, demonstrators protest Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney's opposition of the DREAM Act.
June 15th, 2012
04:24 PM ET

Overheard of CNN.com: Decision to defer some deportations symbolic

Editor's note: This post is part of the Overheard on CNN.com series, a regular feature that examines interesting comments and thought-provoking conversations posted by the community.

Immigration is always a hot-button issue, and can even be a vote-changing one, because it gets to the heart of who we believe we are as Americans and as people. For many readers at CNN.com, the Obama administration's announcement that it will give a two-year deferral from deportation to some young immigrants who came to the United States as children - if they meet certain requirements - is symbolic of society's attitude toward immigration in general.

Obama administration to stop deporting some young illegal immigrants

Quite a few commenters were dismayed, because they have been hoping for politicians to take a hard stance against illegal immigration.

dfr333: "Congratulations Romney, you just got my vote, and I did not even want to vote for you ..."

Rachel1989: "Again, this just riled up the Republican base even more and made Romney look good. This just cost Obama the election."

Some readers were happy because they were afraid someone they knew would be deported.

jboo10141: "I knew a girl in college who was a third year medical student and was fighting against getting deported because her family came here when she was 6. This is a great move. I applaud Obama for standing and doing what he thinks is right. So many young children who came here went to college or went to war and have been doing everything they can to live a fulfilling life now have the chance to do so. Keep up the good work."

Does illegal immigration hurt the United States, and how? Readers don't agree.

starspangled: "We're struggling economically as it is, and now Obama will add more pressure on the poor and middle-class citizen. We cannot continue taking in Latin America into this nation."

PoppyLee: "They're already here. We're just letting them join legally, pay taxes and all that."

Was the decision about political posturing to win over certain groups? FULL POST

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Filed under: Comments • Immigration • What we think
How should parents talk about racism with their kids? Readers share their views
Drew Oglesby and a longtime friend.
March 21st, 2012
03:55 PM ET

How should parents talk about racism with their kids? Readers share their views

Editor's note: This post is part of the Overheard on CNN.com series, a regular feature that examines interesting comments and thought-provoking conversations posted by the community.

Christy Oglesby, quality assurance manager for CNN/U.S. in Atlanta, wrote about the lessons about racism she's felt compelled to pass on to her 12-year old son, Drew. Against the backdrop of the Trayvon Martin shooting, she says she feels justified in doing so. The hundreds of comments that poured in are evidence that the post affected many people quite deeply, and we felt it would be enlightening to share some of the most fascinating remarks with you.

Opinion: My 12-year-old son could be Trayvon

The big questions seemed to be: How should parents talk about race with their children? And how much should we worry about it?

"I am moved to tears by this mother's struggle," said a reader named Tiffany who said she is "humbled" by Oglesby's efforts. Bullying and self-esteem are the kinds of things she says she worries about, not being shot while running through a neighborhood.

"I know many people who argue that racism in this country is a fairy tale in the minds of black people who want pity and welfare ... but still, their children are dying having committed no crime at all. What kind of fairy tale is that?"

Some readers were concerned about the message being sent. FULL POST


Filed under: Comments • Discrimination • Ethnicity